Our Vision

Learning is a social and emotional experience. To support learning across domains, settings, and phases of life, requires attention to strengthening the social-emotional aspects of learning that are ever-present, yet often not directly addressed with teachers and learners. At the SEED Lab, our primary interest is to advance understanding of the role of social-emotional learning (SEL) in schools. We investigate SEL in early childhood education and often push the traditional boundaries of research to include:

  • (1) - Children from under-researched cultures within the United States and abroad
  • (2) - Teachers who are engaged as learners in schools too

By expanding the scope of SEL research beyond the United States and by conceptualizing teachers as learners too, we aim to advance the richness, inclusivity, and comprehensiveness of SEL's theoretical base for scholarship practice.

About Us

The SEED Lab includes graduate and undergraduate students in the School of Education, at the University of Pittsburgh, who view social-emotional learning as central to advancing learning for young children and their teachers. We conduct research in these areas and are committed to applying our findings in Pittsburgh and around the world.

Address

The SEED Lab
c/o Dr. Shannon Wanless
Department of Psychology in Education
School of Education
5922 Wesley W. Posvar Hall
230 S. Bouquet Street
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15260
U.S.A.

Email

seedlab@pitt.edu

Newsletter

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Join Maria Hinojosa as she discusses genuine efforts to acknowledge, overcome, and heal divisions in America.

As the “Discrimination in America” series with Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and NPR reveals, housing and policing discrimination occur far too often. In fact, nearly half of African-Americans surveyed in the study report experiencing discrimination when trying to rent or buy a home. And at least one in five Latinos say they or a family member have been treated unfairly by the courts or unfairly stopped or treated by the police because they are Latino.

This has huge implications for health. Join Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for this Facebook Live broadcast when representatives from across America share their journeys and how they’ve been able to promote inclusive communities and health equity.
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Join Maria Hinojosa as she discusses genuine efforts to acknowledge, overcome, and heal divisions in America. As the “Discrimination in America” series with Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and NPR reveals, housing and policing discrimination occur far too often. In fact, nearly half of African-Americans surveyed in the study report experiencing discrimination when trying to rent or buy a home. And at least one in five Latinos say they or a family member have been treated unfairly by the courts or unfairly stopped or treated by the police because they are Latino. This has huge implications for health. Join Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for this Facebook Live broadcast when representatives from across America share their journeys and how they’ve been able to promote inclusive communities and health equity. As a reporter who was the first Latina in most newsrooms, Maria Hinojosa continues to bring attention to experiences and points of view that are often overlooked and underreported in mainstream media. If you have a question you’d like Maria to ask during the live discussion, please share it in the comments below.

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